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Q.3 Discuss the 3rd June Plan or Mountbatten Plan and also describe how it was implemented? 2018  

The 3rd June Plan, also known as the Mountbatten Plan, was a proposal for the partition of India and the creation of two independent states of India and Pakistan. The plan was put forward by Lord Mountbatten, the last British Viceroy of India, on 3rd June 1947.

Under the plan, India was to be divided into two separate dominions: a Hindu-majority India and a Muslim-majority Pakistan. The Muslim-majority areas of the northwestern and northeastern regions of India were to be included in Pakistan, while the rest of the country would be part of India.

The Mountbatten Plan was accepted by the Indian National Congress and the All-India Muslim League, but it was opposed by some other political parties and religious groups. The plan also faced opposition from some British officials who were concerned about the potential consequences of partition.

The plan was implemented through a process of legislative and administrative action, as well as through communal violence and displacement of populations. The Indian Independence Act of 1947, passed by the British Parliament on 18th July 1947, provided the legal framework for the partition of India and the creation of the two dominions.

On 15th August 1947, India and Pakistan became independent nations. The transfer of power was marked by widespread violence and displacement, as millions of Hindus and Muslims migrated across the newly-drawn borders. The partition of India resulted in the deaths of hundreds of thousands of people, as well as the displacement of millions of others.

In conclusion, the 3rd June Plan, also known as the Mountbatten Plan, was a proposal for the partition of India and the creation of two independent states of India and Pakistan. The plan was implemented through legislative and administrative action, as well as through communal violence and displacement of populations. The partition of India resulted in widespread violence and displacement, and it continues to be a significant event in the history of the Indian subcontinent.

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