CSSEnglish Essay

2 “Brexit means globalisation is the rhetoric of the privileged and capitalism will return Brexit means globalisation is the rhetoric of the privileged and capitalism will return ferociously as ever. 2017

Introduction

The United Kingdom’s decision to leave the European Union (EU) has been a controversial and divisive issue. Supporters of Brexit argue that it will allow the UK to regain control of its borders, laws, and trade policy. However, opponents argue that Brexit will lead to economic and political instability, and will undermine the principles of globalisation and free trade. This essay will explore the argument that “Brexit means globalisation is the rhetoric of the privileged and capitalism will return ferociously as ever.”

Globalisation and Capitalism

Globalisation and capitalism are often seen as two sides of the same coin. Globalisation refers to the process of increasing interconnectedness and interdependence of countries and economies around the world. It involves the free flow of goods, services, capital, and ideas across borders. Capitalism, on the other hand, is an economic system based on private ownership of the means of production and the creation of goods and services for profit.

Supporters of globalisation argue that it leads to greater economic growth, increased efficiency, and improved living standards. However, opponents argue that it leads to inequality, job losses, and the erosion of national sovereignty.

Brexit and Globalisation

Brexit has been seen by some as a rejection of globalisation. Supporters argue that leaving the EU will allow the UK to regain control of its borders, laws, and trade policy, and will enable it to pursue its own interests without interference from Brussels. However, opponents argue that leaving the EU will have negative consequences for the UK’s economy and its position in the global market.

One of the key issues with Brexit is the uncertainty it has created for businesses and investors. The UK’s departure from the EU has created a number of challenges for businesses, including the loss of access to the single market and customs union, and the potential for increased tariffs and trade barriers. This has led to a decline in business confidence and investment, which has had a negative impact on the UK economy.

Brexit and Capitalism

The argument that “Brexit means globalisation is the rhetoric of the privileged and capitalism will return ferociously as ever” suggests that leaving the EU will lead to a return to unfettered capitalism, with little regard for workers’ rights or social welfare.

Supporters of Brexit argue that leaving the EU will allow the UK to reduce regulation and bureaucracy, and create a more business-friendly environment. However, opponents argue that this will lead to a race to the bottom, with companies competing to reduce costs and increase profits at the expense of workers and the environment.

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Brexit has already had an impact on workers’ rights, with the UK government announcing plans to review employment law and regulations. This has led to concerns that workers’ rights could be undermined, particularly in areas such as holiday pay, working hours, and protections for agency workers.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the argument that “Brexit means globalisation is the rhetoric of the privileged and capitalism will return ferociously as ever” suggests that leaving the EU will lead to a return to unfettered capitalism, with little regard for workers’ rights or social welfare. While it is too early to say what the long-term impact of Brexit will be, it is clear that it has created significant uncertainty and challenges for the UK economy and its position in the global market. It is important for the UK government to ensure that Brexit does not lead to a race to the bottom, and that workers’ rights and social welfare are protected in any future trade deals or regulations.

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